Abundance and Justice in our Common Home

with Shelley Tanenbaum and Sara Wolcott
May 31 – June 2, 2019

Register now.
View program brochure.

“It would go a great way to caution and direct people in the use of the world, that they were better studied and
known in the Creation of it. For how could [they] find the Confidence to abuse it, while they should see the Great Creator stare them in the face, in all and every part thereof?” ~ William Penn, 1644-1718

Summoning gardeners and prison justice reformers, mystics and peace advocates to listen deeply to ourselves, the trees, and Spirit. The time for working in silos is over; we can no longer work in isolation. There are deep connections between environmental destruction, the prison system, and health inequalities including violence towards people of color and gender-based violence. All injustice impedes our collective ability to work towards a peaceful world. As climate change continues to threaten our collective survival, Spirit is calling us towards greater connectivity across cultures, issues, and disciplines. Yet how do we articulate the connections we know to be there? How do we serve as bridge builders for networks and communities that do not necessarily share a common language?

Opening with our personal connections; this workshop will support the process of connectivity through the process of “ReMembering” the history behind the multiple forms of violence. We will proceed through a combination of worship sharing, storytelling, engaging with the wisdom of the redwoods, and discovering what support is available to do deep intersectional work to facilitate abundant and justice-filled living individually and collectively. Participants will leave with concrete tools as well as a sense of eco-spirituality and how this is linked to traditional Quaker values of peace and justice. We will move into a place of hope and joy..

ABOUT THE PROGRAM FACILITATORS

Sara Jolena Wolcott is the founder of the ecotheology company, Sequoia Samanvaya. Sara’s work supporting people to enable cultural change is informed by her concern about the colonial and gendered roots of climate change, her experiences integrating music into sustainable development practices in India, and being a chaplain. She is on the board of the Quaker Institute for the Future and a member of Strawberry Creek Monthly Meeting. She lives in New York City (Lenape homeland).

Shelley Tanenbaum is the General Secretary for Quaker Earthcare Witness (QEW) and her focus is climate change and environmental justice. She also serves on the boards of Quaker Institute for the Future and Friends Committee on Legislation in California. She is a member of Strawberry Creek Monthly Meeting in Berkeley, CA (Ohlone homeland).